Oatmeal Iced Cookies

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Oatmeal Iced Cookies are soft in the middle and chewy on the outsides. The craggy tops of these cookies, combined with a thick icing, produce the prettiest cookies!

Oatmeal cookies are some of our favorites, including my Mini Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies, classic Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies, and a holiday favorite, these White Chocolate Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies.

Overhead shot of a plate of cookies.

Frosted Oatmeal Cookies

Ya’ll might recognize these cookies as a copycat to the famous Mother’s brand of iced oatmeal cookies. You may even remember eating them as a kid – if you are in my older generation camp. 😀 If you enjoy the package version, you’re gonna love this homemade version WAY MORE!

I’ve talked a lot about the oatmeal obsession we have in our home, thanks to my hubby. When we’re not eating oatmeal cookies, we’re enjoying Healthy Chocolate Granola, Healthy Oatmeal Breakfast Cookies, Peanut Butter and Jelly Overnight Oats, and Oatmeal Raspberry Jam Bars.

SO MUCH OATMEAL! So little time to eat it all.

A side shot of a stack of cookies on a small plate.

Ingredients Notes

  • Butter and Eggs – You’ll want to use room temperature butter and eggs for this recipe.
  • Sugars – I used an equal proportion of both brown sugar and granulated sugar.
  • Old Fashioned Oatmeal – You’ll need to use a food processor to pulse most of the old fashioned oatmeal for this recipe. When you process some of the oatmeal, it allows you to have different shapes which forms the craggy tops!
  • Flour – I used slightly more flour in this recipe than I did in my regular Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies.

How to make Oatmeal Iced Cookies

Step 1
Mix the wet Ingredients. In a mixing bowl, combine the butter and sugars and mix until creamy. Add the eggs and vanilla, and mix well.

Step 2
Pulse the dry ingredients. To a food processor, combine two cups (reserving 1/2 cup) of the old fashioned oatmeal, the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. Pulse for about 8 seconds. You want most of the oatmeal to be smaller in size.

Step 3
Add dry to wet. Add the dry ingredients, including the reserved 1/2 cup of oatmeal, to the wet ingredients, and mix until combined.

Step 4
Roll into balls. Roll the dough into about 30 balls. The dough may be sticky, so you can chill it for 20 mins or so, or use cold water on your hands to roll.

Step 5
Chill. Chill the cookie dough balls for at least two hours. I normally chill overnight.

Step 6
Bake. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for about 13-14 minutes, or until the cookies are fairly brown on top. You want the cookies to be firm and easy to handle.

Step 7
Cool. Let the cookies sit on baking sheets for a few minutes before transferring to cooling racks. Let cookies cool completely.

A baking sheet with eight baked oatmeal cookies.

Step 8
Make icing. In a small mixing bowl, make the icing by combining the powdered sugar, vanilla, and milk. Check consistency. It should be thick. You may need to adjust ingredients as needed (more powdered sugar to make it thicker, more milk to make it thinner). Add just a little bit at a time.

Step 9
Dip cookies. Take the completely cooled cookies and dip them in the icing. Don’t push or turn, just dip and pull straight out. The icing should set and make the prettiest little “snowflake” design on top, if dipped properly.

Step 10
Let icing harden. Keep the cookies on the cooling racks to let the icing harden. It shouldn’t take more than a couple of hours for it to firm. up. Then you can stack and store them.

Side shot of my hand grabbing a cookie off the plate.

Frequently Asked Questions

How long do I bake these cookies?

All ovens vary greatly, so keep that in mind. You want these cookies to be quite firm so they can be properly dipped in the icing. Don’t under-bake!

How do I get the right consistency when making the icing?

Make sure you measure the ingredients VERY carefully. If the icing is too thick or thin, you can fix it. If it’s too thick, add a few drops of milk. If the icing is too thin, add a bit of powdered sugar.

Does the icing harden enough to stack?

Yes, the icing will harden. Leave them sit on the cooling racks until it sets up completely.

Can you freeze Iced Oatmeal Cookies?

These cookies freeze beautifully (with the icing!) and will keep well in an airtight container for up to three months.

Expert Tips

  1. Use “almost” room temperature butter for better creaming of the butter and sugar.
  2. Carefully measure the flour using the spoon and sweep method. Makes a huge difference when baking!
  3. Chill the cookie dough for at least two hours before baking. This helps the cookies from over spreading.
  4. If your cookies are spreading too much while baking, you can remove the pan, fix the edges with a spoon, and place back in the oven.
  5. Let cookies cool slightly before moving them to cooling racks.

Let’s bake cookies!

A shot of a small plate of an iced cookie.

Kitchen Tools Used: (affiliate links)

xoxo ~Sue

Overhead shot of a plate of cookies.

Oatmeal Iced Cookies

Oatmeal Iced Cookies are soft in the middle and chewy on the outsides. The craggy tops of these cookies, combined with a thick icing, produce the prettiest cookies!
5 from 3 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: oatmeal iced cookies
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 13 minutes
Total Time: 27 minutes
Servings: 30 cookies
Calories: 169kcal
Author: Sue Ringsdorf

Ingredients

For the cookies:

  • 1 cup unsalted butter – at room temperature
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs – at room temp
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract – I like Watkin's brand
  • 2 ½ cups old fashioned oatmeal
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

For the icing:

  • 1 ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ Tablespoons milk – add a bit at a time

Instructions

  • Mix the wet Ingredients. In a mixing bowl, combine the butter and sugars and mix until creamy. Add the eggs and vanilla, and mix well.
  • Pulse the dry ingredients. To a food processor, combine two cups (reserving 1/2 cup) of the old fashioned oatmeal, the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. Pulse for about 8 seconds. You want most of the oatmeal to be smaller in size.
  • Add dry to wet. Add the dry ingredients, including the reserved 1/2 cup of oatmeal, to the wet ingredients, and mix until combined.
  • Roll into balls. Roll the dough into about 30 balls. The dough may be sticky, so you can chill it for 20 mins or so, or use cold water on your hands to roll.
  • Chill. Chill the cookie dough balls for at least two hours. I normally chill overnight.
  • Bake. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for about 13-14 minutes, or until the cookies are fairly brown on top. You want the cookies to be firm and easy to handle.
  • Make icing. In a small mixing bowl, make the icing by combining the powdered sugar, vanilla, and milk. Check consistency. It should be thick. You may need to adjust ingredients as needed (more powdered sugar to make it thicker, more milk to make it thinner). Add just a little bit at a time.
  • Dip cookies. Take the completely cooled cookies and dip them in the icing. Don’t push or turn, just dip and pull straight out. The icing should set and make the prettiest little “snowflake” design on top, if dipped properly.
  • Let icing harden. Keep the cookies on the cooling racks to let the icing harden. It shouldn’t take more than a couple of hours for it to firm. up. Then you can stack and store them.
  • NOTE: If your cookies are spreading too much while baking, you can remove the pan toward the end of baking time, fix the edges with a spoon, and place back in the oven.

Notes

FAQs

How long do I bake these cookies?
All ovens vary greatly, so keep that in mind. You want these cookies to be quite firm so they can be properly dipped in the icing. Don’t under-bake!
How do I get the right consistency when making the icing?
Make sure you measure the ingredients VERY carefully. If the icing is too thick or thin, you can fix it. If it’s too thick, add a few drops of milk. If the icing is too thin, add a bit of powdered sugar.
Does the icing harden enough to stack?
Yes, the icing will harden. Leave them sit on the cooling racks until it sets up completely.
Can you freeze Iced Oatmeal Cookies?
These cookies freeze beautifully (with the icing!) and will keep well in an airtight container for up to three months.

Nutrition

Calories: 169kcal | Carbohydrates: 25g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 29mg | Sodium: 123mg | Potassium: 39mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 16g | Vitamin A: 209IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 13mg | Iron: 1mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @Suebeehomemaker or tag #suebeehomemaker!

3 Comments

  1. This might be the best cookie ever!

  2. Linda Aull says:

    5 stars plus!!!! These are my favorite oatmeal cookie ever, the dough (my favorite part) was so scrumptious it was as tempting as the finished product. They are also very pretty and festive!

    1. Suebee Homemaker says:

      Thanks so much for trying these, Linda! They really are pretty, aren’t they?!

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